Are we ready for a Netflix for Sports?

Are we ready for a Netflix for Sports?

Being a sports fan is an expensive habit. Ticket prices for games are sky high – WRU tickets recently tipped the £100 mark for the first time in the organisation’s history. So, it’s not surprising most of us will prefer to tune in at home to indulge our habits. There has never been more choice for viewers and the amount of sport being broadcast is the best it’s ever been.

 

As a women in sport, I couldn’t be more excited to see how accessible hockey has become on TV in the past few years following Olympic success. Not to mention being able to watch the thrilling England Netball Commonwealth campaign from the comfort of iPlayer last month.

Streaming rights

Sports broadcasting is a complicated landscape however. With streaming rights for certain leagues often split across multiple broadcasters – these days you need a Sky Sports subscription to watch the Premier League, BT Sport to watch the Aviva Premiership and Amazon Prime if you want to watch the NFL. And that’s not even taking some of the more obscure platforms into consideration. My Netball Live subscription is the best £13 investment I’ve made this year – and currently the only option in the UK for watching the professional Suncorp Super Netball from Australia.

‘Netflix for Sports’

There’s no one size fits all subscription package for the ultimate sport fan. Consumers have been crying out for a ‘Netflix for Sports’ for a long time, and there’s a very good reason it’s yet to materialise. Sport is a prolific business, and the cost for live streaming rights is at a premium. The Premier League is the biggest prize in British sport broadcasting, and Sky recently signed a £3.6bn deal to air the majority of the games for the next 3 seasons.

When you consider Netflix paid a record £100m in production costs for the first series of global drama The Crown – it puts the cost of multiple sport rights in context. Sky paid a golden sum for the Premier League, and it’s still not an exclusive deal.

Digital giants

That’s not to say sport isn’t attracting the big tech players. Amazon recently paid a reported $50million for the rights to stream 11 NFL games this season. A package the digital giant managed to win over rival Twitter. And niche markets such as esports have long been reaching their audiences through digital platforms such as Facebook and Twitch.

There are exciting ripples of movement over the pond towards a ‘Netflix for Sports’ format, from the likes of ESPN and CBS. I for one am interested to see how the pay-per-game format of Turner’s Bleacher Report Live will pay off, as it brings together a variety of sports under one model.

Content sharing

But much has to be said about the impact of multiple broadcasting packages from leagues in all this. Live TV broadcast, digital streaming rights, highlight packages, near-live broadcast and goal-clips for the same league are all being sold separately. As a result, there’s so much more content than ever before being auctioned to the highest bidder.

With Sky Sports and BT recently reaching a content-sharing agreement on the Premier League, there appears to be some level of consolidation of rights. So while we might not be ready for an all-encompassing ‘Netflix for Sport’ just yet – change may just be on the horizon.

By Abi Williams, Account Manager, Franklin Rae

The Press Room: Kim Carr, Freelance

The Press Room: Kim Carr, Freelance

Freelance Entertainment Editor, Kim Carr (left!), writes about TV and Showbiz for national newspapers including The Sun and Daily Mirror. This month she tells us about some of her favourite stories of the moment.

What are you writing about at the moment?

I interviewed Strictly’s Aston Merrygold last week, who is now out on a solo music tour before joining up with fellow dancing stars Harry Judd and Louis Smith in theatre show Rip It Up. It’s nice to see the former JLS member getting a second stab at solo success with his single Get Stupid getting a second lease of life now it’s soundtracking the new Samsung Galaxy TV advert.

What are the headlines everyone’s talking about at the moment?

We’re enjoying the return of Britain’s Got Talent but the Ant McPartlin situation still rumbles on and is generating a lot of heat among TV fans on both sides of the industry. On a personal note, I am still reeling about the death of Timmy Matley, The Overtones singer who was thought to be recovering from skin cancer and looked well when performing on Jane McDonald’s Channel 5 show recently. He was only 36 and a lovely man.

What is your biggest frustration as a journalist?

As a freelancer being asked which publication you’re covering an event or interview for in advance can be annoying, because these days commissions often don’t come until after you can offer quotes to a publication. PRs should consider that having a freelancer at an event or doing an interview offers them the opportunity to reach more than one publication because we can usually share out content to multiple outlets. We take up one space and can deliver lots of content – what’s not to like about that?

What are you watching at the moment?

I’m watching the final series of Nashville with sadness that it’s coming to an end, but also relieved as it feels like it’s done its time. It’s making me want to return to Music City to enjoy the amazing Southern cooking and hospitality of the people but I’ll have to make do with seeing some of the cast live at the 02 Arena in London instead.

What do you need to know about brand licensing?

What do you need to know about brand licensing?

Brand licensing often goes hand in hand with great entertainment IP. So, what do you need to know about this fast paced industry? Award winning licensing agent Caroline Mickler offers her expert insights in our latest ‘Connections’ blog.

 

The landscape in which kids entertainment and the parallel world of brand licensing sits is changing rapidly. The changes are not only happening where children are searching for and viewing content, but also in the way they look for merchandise associated with their favourite characters.

The retail space is also evolving at a rapid pace. While the traditional bricks and mortar stores are still dominant, online spend is ever increasing. Competing for space in the traditional retail store is becoming harder for small or new kids entertainment brands as shelves are often dominated by large production companies’ merchandise. Online retail becomes an important player for the smaller companies to gain ‘space’ for consumers to find their brands.

Creating theatre

As online spend grows, high street stores need to create a reason for people to bring their children into stores. Companies like The Entertainer and LEGO are good examples of how retailers are adapting to this by creating a sense of theatre. When you enter the Leicester Square LEGO store in London, it is not the boxes of the latest LEGO that draws you in, but rather the chance to take your photo in the life size LEGO underground carriage or play at the ‘Pick and Build’ wall. Major toy retailer, The Entertainer, regularly has toy demonstrations and character visits to their stores to keep customers coming back.

Keeping up with the trends

It is not only in-store theatre that is important, but also being quick enough to recognise the latest trend such as fidget spinners or slime. These can be successful married up with your IP. Understanding where kids are consuming content or finding the latest trends is now vital for the children’s licensing industry and moving on with these trends as quickly as the kids do is also a necessity.

Digital consumption

While linear TV is still an important player in brand building and awareness for entertainment properties, the way the children are consuming these shows is moving more toward SVOD, and user generated content across a multitude of platforms. The rise of ‘kid influencers’ on YouTube creating ‘unboxing’ content of new crazes and toys is on the increase. Social platforms are not only generating the rise of the kid influencer but also the rise of user generated content. Children are able to snap, video and create their own content on platforms such as PopJam, SnapChat and Musical.ly, creating a whole wave of content that traditional kids entertainment properties are also now competing with for ‘eye balls’ and engagement.

Personalisation

One way retailers and the licensing industry have been able to become part of this fast-paced kids entertainment space is through personalisation. Examples include companies such as LEGO creating the in-store ‘Mosiac Maker’, or Evode group working with toy retailer, The Entertainer to create personalised branded products online and delivered to the store for collection. Online, the children’s digital brand, Bebods give kids the chance to create their own character and share their world via the PopJam platform.

The future is certainly up for grabs by the agile in the industry.

Caroline Mickler is an award winning licensing agent at Caroline Mickler Ltd

Content, communication & connections

Content, communication & connections

It’s not every day you make the decision to return to a job you left more than four years ago but that’s exactly what I did, returning to Franklin Rae at the tail end of last year. So why did I come back? Well, that’s an easy one.

Content

Franklin Rae has a long legacy in working with media and entertainment companies, helping them to communicate their messages to the industry as well as promoting their content to consumer audiences.  Working with creative companies has always been something I’ve loved and getting to do it at an agency with such a unique offering was an opportunity I couldn’t pass up.

Communication

The team here at Franklin Rae have such a wide range of experience, they all bring something unique to the table. Whether it’s a heritage in working with brands and/or producers, a passion for factual programming, a somewhat unnerving love of Rob Brydon, experience working in-house for distributors, a history of working for the trade press, or a love of all things TOWIE, everyone brings something to the company which helps to build our effectiveness and deliver for our clients.

Connections

Not only does Franklin Rae pride itself on its communication strategies, it also looks to bring added value to clients in a range of different ways. Connecting people is an important part of trying to bring that added value and as you can see from this month’s newsletter we’ve spent the past few weeks working with Edge Investments, setting up opportunities for production companies/content producers to meet with a VC and hear all about what they are looking for and how to be investment ready. Our feedback showed that those who attended found the event really useful and that’s what’s important to us.

Our plan for 2018 is to continue working with creative companies, connecting those in our network and adding value wherever we can. If Rob Brydon also wanted to stop by that would be a bonus.

By Leigh Turnbull, Managing Director, Franklin Rae

The Best TV Moments of 2017

The Best TV Moments of 2017

Christmas is the perfect time of year to look back and reflect on what’s made some of the best TV moments of 2017. There’s been plenty of highlights across all genres in the past 12 months, and the FR team have picked out their favourites. See if you agree with their choices!

Big Little Lies

Sky Atlantic – March 2017

Melanie Webb, Senior Account Director: “I am a sucker for a good TV drama. So, I absolutely loved this series and the grand finale was one of the best hours of television I’ve ever seen. The climax was teased from the very first episode, and part of the intrigue of this series was trying to solve the mystery (before it happened). The series worked back to front, which was a clever narrative tactic. The whole scene was shown in complete silence which not only made it so much more powerful, but was testament to the incredible acting and direction. I can’t wait to see what the second series brings.”

British & Irish Lions

Sky Sports – August 2017

Abi Williams, Account Manager: “It takes something special for me to get out of bed at 8am on a Saturday morning. But, I was committed to getting up and watching all three test matches for the British & Irish Lions tour to New Zealand this summer. And the commitment certainly paid off. After a disappointing start, the last two games made for some of the most entertaining TV of the Summer. I have to confess to watching the last 5 minutes of the final test behind a cushion. Now I can look forward to opening the DVD of the behind the scenes documentary in my stocking at Christmas, and reliving the whole thing again.”

Icarus

Netflix – August 2017

Xander Ross, Junior Account Manager: “Icarus has one of the most unexpected and dramatic shifts in narrative in a documentary I’ve ever seen. Bryan Fogel, filmmaker and amateur cyclist decided to see how doping would improve his performance in competition, whilst seeing how easy it was to avoid detection. In one heart pounding scene, Fogel’s contact Dr. Grigory Rodchenkov has to escape Russia following threats to his life from the state. I was on the edge of my seat wondering whether he would make it or not. It’s not often a documentary has done that so powerfully for me.”

Have I Got News For You

BBC One – November 2017

Sarah Walker, Corporate Communications and Marketing: “My best TV moment of 2017 has to be when the irrepressible and forthright Jo Brand slapped down the Have I Got News For You all male panel, when they appeared to make light of the sexual harassment claims in Westminster during the height of the Harvey Weinstein scandal. Her rebuke rightly touched a nerve and garnered cheers and applause from the audience. It must one of the few times in the show’s history that both Paul Merton and Ian Hislop – and their partners in crime journalist Quentin Letts and actor Miles Jupp – have been rendered speechless. Go Jo!”

Peaky Blinders

BBC Two – November 2017

Eve Edmunds, Account Executive: “The return of Peaky Blinders was long overdue and the perfect way to settle into the long winter ahead. Dark, gritty, grey and yet somehow incredibly glamorous, this series so far has been packed with the perfect dose of drama. Tommy Shelby is the star of the show as he attempts to reconcile with his family in the face of his greatest threat. In this series, the subplot of political turmoil also provides a really interesting historical backdrop to the internal drama. Never has the idea of being a 1920s Brummie gangster been so appealing.”

2017 in summary

Leigh Turnbull, Managing Director: “Despite everything going on in the world this year, we have thankfully had some pretty outstanding TV to distract us. We’ve been spoiled by incredible dramas, both returning series and brand new productions. Favourite moments for me included Olenna Tyrell’s final speech in Game of Thrones, Balaclava Man’s reveal in Line of Duty, the return of Victoria, the finale of Broadchurch, finally getting justice for Barb, everything about Catastrophe, and Tom Hardy being Tom Hardy in Taboo.  New dramas to hit our screen and offer some incredible TV also included Three Girls, The Handmaid’s Tale, Mindhunter, Big Little Lies, Broken and Fearless to name but a few.

Not forgetting, we’ve also been treated to some summer fun in Love Island, Stanley Johnson negotiating his way through the jungle, Strictly shock eliminations, thought-provoking storylines from the soaps and the unveiling of a history-making Doctor.  As I said to the team, it’s too difficult to pick just one of these but if I really have to pick my favourite TV moment, it might just have to be this…

Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and happy telly-watching!

The Making of an International Drama

The Making of an International Drama

This time every year London plays host to the international drama industry. Producers, broadcasters and commissioners from around the world come together to do business and discuss what makes great TV at C21’s International Drama Summit. So what are the challenges facing international drama producers?

During an in-depth panel about TV drama development, Jill Green, Chief Executive at Eleventh Hour Films said:

“The perfect partnership for a co-production doesn’t come along very often. The challenge for indies [like us] is making that partnership work on an international scale.”

Judging from the audience’s reaction, it’s a sentiment felt industry-wide.

This week, we had the pleasure of announcing an exciting international development and distribution deal between Eleventh Hour Films and Sony Pictures Television International Production. A UK and US collaboration that tells a story from British history, set on a US air base, it ticks all the right boxes for an international partnership.

Rendlesham is a compelling and emotional family drama inspired by the real-life UFO incident which took place at a US air base close to the village of Rendlesham, Suffolk in 1980. The series plays out against the height of the Cold War, exploring themes which resonate stronger than ever today.

With award-winning writer and director Joe Ahearne confirmed to helm the show – it also goes to show that great talent is key to making great international drama come to life.

The Rendlesham announcement coincided with the opening day of the Drama Summit, and was received with applause during sessions featuring Sony’s Wayne Garvey and Eleventh Hour Film’s Jill Green. With a full sweep of coverage across the board in Variety, Deadline, The Hollywood Reporter, Broadcast, C21 and Worldscreen – the news has made an impact for Eleventh Hour at a key time in the industry calendar.