The Press Room: John Reynolds, Freelance

The Press Room: John Reynolds, Freelance

This month, we speak to veteran media journalist and host of the Media & Marketing podcast, John Reynolds. From Martin Sorrell to the BBC, find out what’s making the news in the media sphere.

 

 

What are you writing about at the moment?

I work as a freelance general news reporter, so write about anything and everything, from transgenderism to Grenfell. On the media and marketing front, I am following what Martin Sorrell is up to and also interested in new news brands network The Ozone Project. The death of media agencies and problems of the big holding groups like WPP and Publicis are also interesting topics.

What are the headlines everyone’s talking about at the moment?

Everything from trans toilets in organisations to BBC staff being overpaid, and even the death of media agencies.

 What is your biggest frustration as a journalist?

Getting stories. It’s become too hard to break stories now in the 24 hour news cycle. Journalists are simply tweeting exclusives with just a few words and not even bothering to substantiate the tweet with a story. It can also be frustrating having to hit up contacts all the time for stories and not getting much in return.

 What are you watching at the moment?

The World Cup.

Franklin Rae PR acquires The Media Foundry

Franklin Rae PR acquires The Media Foundry

Content and creative sector PR experts acquire the marketing and media sector specialist

Franklin Rae PR today announces that it has acquired The Media Foundry, a PR agency that focuses on businesses working within the media and marketing industries.

The acquisition will see the agency move from its current home at The Cubo Group and brought under the Franklin Rae umbrella, allowing the company to expand its current offering in the marketing sector as well as further grow its footprint with media and brands.

Set up in 1998, The Media Foundry has a heritage in working with the great and the good of adland including Karen Blackett OBE, Annette King, Ian Pearman and Laurence Green. In recent years the agency has expanded its offering to become the PR agency for all media & marketing professionals – working with brand-side CMOs including Mark Evans at Direct Line Group, and adtech/martech companies.

Franklin Rae, a leading name in the content sector offers PR services to the production, distribution and creative industries, raising the profile of both businesses and the content they produce. Established in 2003, the company works with world leaders in TV, Film and the creative industries, including producers of BAFTA winning ‘People Just Do Nothing’, Roughcut TV, global content distributor, Keshet International, creative company Gravity Road and award winning creators of sporting content, Noah Media Group.

Franklin Rae CEO Tessa Laws commented, “TMF have a fantastic reputation in the industry, a great team and a host of exciting clients that align perfectly with our own strategy and ambitions for the future of Franklin Rae.”

Cubo Group CEO, Kerry Simpson added, “This is a great strategic move for both parties. TMF’s specialism is a perfect fit for Franklin Rae and they can be a formidable combination in their sector”

Following the acquisition the TMF team will continue to work in partnership with its current clients as well as developing a wider offering in conjunction with Franklin Rae.

The Press Room: Molly Flemming, Marketing Week

The Press Room: Molly Flemming, Marketing Week

We welcomed Molly Flemming, news reporter at Marketing Week, to our Press Room this month. Covering FMCG, food and drink, charities, energy, gambling, travel and leisure, Molly has a keen eye for a story in the marketing and creative industries. She tells us all about the top campaign topics of the moment and what brands are looking out for.

 

What are you writing about at the moment?

At the moment I am writing quite a bit about brand purpose. With the plastic debate and #metoo movement I think brands are starting to realise the importance of being socially responsible – be that about the environment, mental health or other important issues.

What are the headlines everyone’s talking about at the moment?

For some time brands have been talking about how to make the most of data with the rise of digital. But the Cambridge Analytica scandal and GDPR mean there’s even more interest around how companies are using data. It’s a huge talking point.

What is your biggest frustration as a journalist?

I think that from a personal perspective you always feel as though you could be doing more or writing more and you have to learn to switch off. Professionally? When people are so media trained that they lose any ability to speak naturally, which makes it harder to interview them and get a good quote.

What are you watching at the moment?

RuPaul’s Drag Race season 10 has started, so my Friday nights are devoted to that until it ends.

How can you harness the power of the influencer? 

How can you harness the power of the influencer? 

There’s no doubt. We’re in the age of the ‘influencer’. So how can you make the most of these profiles in your PR and marketing campaign? Marketing and Influencer Consultant, Freya Lifely offers her expert insights in our latest ‘Connections’ blog.

 

Snap felt the power of ‘the influencer’ in full force last month. An 18-word tweet by Kylie Jenner to her 24.5m followers about the Snapchat messaging app was all it took to wipe $1.3 billion off its market value.

The tweet followed the much-criticised Snapchat redesign and the platform’s infamously slow reaction to influencers and brand opportunities; only recently opening up its Marketing API and insights for creators. A function that has been available on competing sites for years.

Influencer power is something that brands are becoming keen to harness as part of their publicity and marketing mix. While there are only a few who can afford to work with influencer superstars like Jenner and her Kardashian sisters, there is a raft of online influencers who fill the same space as opinion leaders and decision makers for modern, digital audiences.

Running influencer marketing campaigns is notoriously complex. A lack of industry-wide measurement or standards mean that it can be hard to know where to start. These are some tips for a successful campaign:

Know your goal

Set the KPIs for your campaign before you start. Whether it’s brand awareness, click throughs to a website or event attendance, know what you want to achieve before you reach out to influencers. Using a defined objective to inform your creative, messaging and call to action will provide a useful benchmark against which to measure the performance of your campaign.

Select the right people

Bigger isn’t always better, and choosing influencers based on reach alone won’t ensure you have an impactful campaign. Analysing engagements on posts to get an idea of the influencer’s audience and engagement will help focus your campaign.

Be sure to request the audience age, gender and location demographics. This information is available on all main social channels for influencers to access, and doing the right research will help you to know what of their audience is made up of the people that you want to reach. Some male 25-year-old influencers have an audience made up mostly of 15-year-old girls – not ideal if your target is young adult men.

Authenticity is key

Influencer power comes from their authenticity. So, work with influencers who like your product or brand and aren’t just in it for the fee. Collaborate on creative routes and listen to the influencers’ ideas on how best to resonate with their audience.

Think outside the box

Leverage the strengths or USPs of your brand to inform the type of content you create. Some of the best influencer campaigns with influencers go beyond the obvious and come up with fun, sharable content which will achieve much better penetration than just a straight sales pitch.

Disclosure

There are legal requirements for disclosing branded content on social channels. Previously a grey area, rules are much stricter now. Be aware of them internally and make sure your influencer is willing to use full disclosure or it could cause trouble for your brand.

Freya Lifely is an independent marketing and influencer consultant, specialising in the media and entertainment industries

Content, communication & connections

Content, communication & connections

It’s not every day you make the decision to return to a job you left more than four years ago but that’s exactly what I did, returning to Franklin Rae at the tail end of last year. So why did I come back? Well, that’s an easy one.

Content

Franklin Rae has a long legacy in working with media and entertainment companies, helping them to communicate their messages to the industry as well as promoting their content to consumer audiences.  Working with creative companies has always been something I’ve loved and getting to do it at an agency with such a unique offering was an opportunity I couldn’t pass up.

Communication

The team here at Franklin Rae have such a wide range of experience, they all bring something unique to the table. Whether it’s a heritage in working with brands and/or producers, a passion for factual programming, a somewhat unnerving love of Rob Brydon, experience working in-house for distributors, a history of working for the trade press, or a love of all things TOWIE, everyone brings something to the company which helps to build our effectiveness and deliver for our clients.

Connections

Not only does Franklin Rae pride itself on its communication strategies, it also looks to bring added value to clients in a range of different ways. Connecting people is an important part of trying to bring that added value and as you can see from this month’s newsletter we’ve spent the past few weeks working with Edge Investments, setting up opportunities for production companies/content producers to meet with a VC and hear all about what they are looking for and how to be investment ready. Our feedback showed that those who attended found the event really useful and that’s what’s important to us.

Our plan for 2018 is to continue working with creative companies, connecting those in our network and adding value wherever we can. If Rob Brydon also wanted to stop by that would be a bonus.

By Leigh Turnbull, Managing Director, Franklin Rae

A UK PR in Paris…

A UK PR in Paris…

Last month we ventured to Paris for Series Mania – the co-production event for scripted producers, and it was buzzing. Now in its eighth year, Series Mania is less about selling TV and more about celebrating the creative talent off-screen and nurturing co-production relationships.

Co-producing with partners that can add real value has become more important to a show’s success. Gone are the days where you would receive a healthy commission from a broadcaster to make a show and a good advance from your distributor, plus additional amounts of income from sales. Although having a broadcaster on-board remains somewhat critical, a production may also need co-pro partners that bring something in addition to finance to the table. It could be a different cultural perspective – resulting in a broader appeal amongst audiences, or it could be a fantastic showrunner, casting relationship, a location genius, a rocking writing-room, a relationship with broadcasters in a different territory, a stockpile of the latest hardware, a fantastic post-facility or just a different way of working.

Series Mania has a different vibe to other events we attend. It’s more creative, with producers discussing the challenges of a second series, how networks can kill a show, or even why Nordic comedy travels. There’s also a full day of experienced production companies from all over Europe pitching their show concept on stage in front of the industry – all looking to forge alliances to get their projects off the ground.

The organisers did an amazing job too in looking after us delegates. Hospitality really makes such a difference and we were spoilt with drinks at the jawdroppingly gorgeous gilt-laden Hotel de Ville, followed by dinner the next day at The Museum of Natural History.

Throughout the whole event, it was refreshing to see the top European production companies building relationships with their UK counterparts.

Great relationships have to start somewhere and Paris definitely isn’t a bad backdrop. Who knows where they may end up?

By Sophie Naylor, Managing Director at Franklin Rae.