This month, former Televisual editor turned freelance journalist, Tim Dams talks to us about the impact of FAANG on the TV industry and why everyone is obsessed with this season’s smash hit BBC drama Bodyguard.

 

What are you writing about at the moment?

The FAANGs. As a journalist, it seems you can’t avoid writing about them at the moment, as the disruption they’ve unleashed on the TV and film market is so profound. They’ve brought greater opportunity for lots of indies, particularly drama producers. But they’ve sparked a crisis of confidence at British terrestrial broadcasters and US cable channels, who are the still the main clients of most indies. The drift away by viewers from linear schedules is, if anything, under-reported, particularly among younger audiences.

What are the headlines that everyone’s talking about?

In terms of programmes, it’s Bodyguard, which has put a bit of spring back in the step of the BBC. More generally, many of the headlines are now about how companies are partnering up to compete with the US tech giants. That could be European broadcasters partnering to co-fund programmes, or British broadcasters working together on their own joint-streaming service. ‘Partnership’ is the buzz word of 2018.

What is your biggest frustration as a journalist?

Transcribing interviews. In this era of Amazon Alexa and voice-activated tech, I still can’t believe I’m having to do this. I wish there was a reliable piece of tech that could covert audio to print yet. It would save me hours each week.

What are you watching on TV at the moment?

Like everyone, Bodyguard. I’ve yet to see the last episode though, so am desperately trying to avoid any reference to it in the media. I’ve just started Money Heist (La Casa de Papel) on Netflix – I’m a bit late to this Spanish hit, but it looks good so far. I recently interviewed director Michael Waldman about his upcoming documentary Inside the Foreign Office for BBC2 and that’s definitely one to look out for.